NetGalley Author Interview: Terri Blackstock

Watch our author video interview, “15 minutes with… Terri Blackstock,” now! Here, we discuss Blackstock’s If I Run series, writing in multiple genres and the inspiration behind her novels. You don’t want to miss this interview brought to you by NetGalley, Meryl Moss Media and BookTrib.com.

If I'm Found

Request It!

Pub Date: March 21, 2017
Mystery & Thrillers, Christian
Published by Zondervan Fiction

See More of Their Titles

Is Dylan hunting Casey to prosecute her or protect her?

Casey Cox is still on the run, fleeing prosecution for a murder she didn’t commit. Dylan Roberts—her most relentless pursuer—is still on her trail, but his secret emails insist that he knows the truth and wants to help her. He’s let her escape before when he had her in his grasp, but trust doesn’t come easily.

As Casey works to collect evidence about the real murderers, she stumbles on another unbearable injustice: an abused child and a suicidal man who’s also been falsely accused. Casey risks her own safety to right this wrong and protect the little girl from her tormenters. But doing so is risky and just may result in her capture—and if she’s captured, she has no doubt she’ll be murdered before she ever steps foot in a jail.

In this riveting sequel to the USA Today bestseller If I Run, evil lurks, drawing Casey out of the shadows . . . but there is light shining in the darkness. Is Dylan a provision from the God who loves her, or another heartache yet to happen?

Divider

NetGalley Author Interview: Cara Putman

From veteran author Cara Putman, Beyond Justice weaves a tale of mystery and suspense as up-and-coming lawyer Hayden McCarthy takes on the government in a controversial wrongful death case.

Beyond Justice

Request It!

Pub Date: April 4, 2017
Mystery & Thrillers, Christian
Published by Thomas Nelson - Fiction

See More of Their Titles

Hayden McCarthy is on track to become the youngest partner in her prestigious D.C. law firm . . . if the case she’s just been handed doesn’t destroy her first.

Hayden McCarthy knows firsthand the pain when justice is not served. It’s why she became an attorney and why she’s so driven in her career. When she’s handed a wrongful death case against the government, she isn’t sure if it’s the lucky break she needs to secure a partnership-or an attempt to make sure she never gets there. She keeps the case alive through sheer determination and more than a little creativity, but then she’s fired by a partner with a vendetta.

Further complicating matters, Hayden keeps finding herself completely distracted by Andrew, her roommate’s cousin. But his father is a Congressman and she’s currently taking on the government. Could the timing be any worse?

The longer she keeps the case active, the higher the stakes become. Unknown enemies seem determined to see either the case-or her-die. Should she fight alone for the dead young man by launching her own unfinanced firm, or abandon the case in order to save her own life?

Divider

Exclusive Interview with Jeff Giles

We’re excited to share this special Q&A with Jeff Giles about his book, The Edge of Everything, and something exciting he’s doing with Quarterly:

This quarter’s box is curated by Jeff Giles, featuring an exclusive, annotated copy of The Edge of Everything, an action-packed fantastical thriller. Also find in the box two more books, handpicked by Giles that inspired him as an author, plus awesome bookish goods — perfect for YA book lovers. (Psst: Act fast, subscribe by January 27th to get this box and use the discount mentioned below.)

NetGalley Author Interview

The Edge of Everything

Request It!

Pub Date: Jan 31, 2017
Teens & YA
Published by Bloomsbury USA Children's Books

Could you tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got into writing?

I grew up in Massachusetts in a pretty loud, unhappy family, so I spent a lot of time holed up in my room with my baseball cards and my guitar and my fantasy novels. I wasn’t much of a baseball player, and I was really bad at guitar (I still play and I’m STILL bad, actually). So I guess what I’m saying is: writing was the only thing I loved that I didn’t suck at. I tried writing all kinds of things when I was young: plays, song lyrics, short stories, poems. By the time I went to college, I’d decided to try being a journalist. My dream was that I’d write articles for a living until I wrote a novel good enough to be published. That took MANY more years than I thought it would!

What is your favorite novel of all time?

Please don’t make me answer this! It’s too hard to choose!

Let me try this: My favorite YA novel right this second is Still Life with Tornado (A.S. King).
My favorite novel to recommend to “grown-ups” is Bel Canto (Ann Patchett). My favorite funny novel is Where’d You Go, Bernadette (Maria Semple). My favorite weird novel is The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle (Haruki Murakami). My favorite sci fi novel is Never Let Me Go (Kazuo Ishiguro).

In your opinion, has there ever been a movie that is better than the book?

I know this will be controversial, but I actually think there are a lot. It usually happens with action and suspense, because those genres are just MADE for the big screen. One really old example is “Jaws.” I’m sure the novel was a fun summer read, but Steven Spielberg’s movie was the first blockbuster and changed Hollywood forever. I won’t say that Peter Jackson’s “Lord of the Rings” movies are BETTER than the Tolkien novels—mostly because I don’t want all your subscribers to hate me—but I do think they’re every bit as good, and maybe even more exciting.

Which three authors would you invite to a dinner party?

J.K. Rowling, because obviously! Charles Dickens, because J.K. Rowling would love to meet him, I bet. And E.M. Forester, because I love his novels—and I think Dickens would feel bad if he were the only dead guy there.

Your debut novel, The Edge of Everything, has a leading female protagonist, how did you get into character and develop her voice throughout the novel?

I began writing the novel while I was living in Brooklyn, and I finished it after we’d moved to Montana, so Zoe is sort of a combination of what I love most about both places: the funny-smart/take-no-crap NYC thing mixed with the outdoorsy, self-reliant western thing. More importantly, my daughter is a big reader, and I knew she’d read the novel some day. There is NO WAY she would approve of a female character who wasn’t tough and brave and badass. Zoe sort of has my sense of humor, but she’s cooler than me in every other way.

Do you have any advice for young writers?

Tons! Try to write on a regular schedule. Turn off the WiFi or you won’t get anything done. Read everything you write out loud—both to yourself and others. There’s no better way to tell if something flows and makes sense and if you’re proud of it. Remember that absolutely everyone writes a lot of bad stuff on the way to writing good stuff. Make sure there are enough snacks in the house.

What was the thought process behind curating your Literary YA Box?

I had so much fun! I wanted to share books about girls with real purpose—and who were in the midst of figuring out who they were. Then I picked some cool odds and ends to make the whole reading experience a little brighter, warmer and more special.

Click here to get Jeff Giles’ Literary YA Box, complete with an exclusive, annotated copy of The Edge of Everything! (Plus! As a NetGalley member, you get an exclusive 10% discount! Just enter the code: NETGALLEY10 at checkout.)

What is your favorite thing that you have received in the mail?

I sent an advance copy of The Edge of Everything on a little “tour” of other YA authors, and they all wrote and doodled all over it and told me what they liked best. One friend, the middle grade author Melanie Conklin, even drew a great picture of my leading man X’s tattooed arm. It was the first piece of fan art I ever got, and it really made me glow.

Divider

Exclusive Interview with S.J. Kincaid

The+Diabolic+YA+boxWe’re excited to share this special Q&A with S.J. Kincaid about her book, The Diabolic, and something cool she’s doing with Quarterly:

This quarter’s box is curated by S.J. Kincaid, featuring an exclusive, annotated copy of The Diabolic, an action-packed psychological thriller/fantasy. Also find in the box two more books, handpicked by Kincaid that inspired her as an author, plus awesome bookish goods — perfect for YA book lovers. (Psst: Act fast, subscribe by November 7th to get this box.)

NetGalley Author Interview

The Diabolic

Request It!

Pub Date: Nov 1, 2016
Teens & YA
Published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers

See More of Their Titles

Could you tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got into writing?

I’m originally from Alabama, but I’ve spent most of my life moving between California and Chicago. I’ve written as a hobby ever since I was very young, mostly because my older sister was a writer, and I liked to do everything she did (and I still am! We’re both professional writers now!) Before getting published, though, I moved between several different jobs, and then went to nursing school. I was not a very good nurse.

What is your favorite novel of all time?

It has to be Legacy by Susan Kay. It was a hugely influential novel for me. This is a book I can say literally changed the course of my life, because it ignited a fascination with Tudor history that became the first of many intellectual pursuits born purely out of curiosity, not just because I was assigned research for school.

In your opinion, has there ever been a movie that is better than the book?

I think this could be incredibly subjective, but for me personally, Starship Troopers the movie was more to my taste than the book. They were drastically different, actually, and I saw the movie first. Science fiction purists will probably mock me for this, but I can take it. I just really enjoyed the campiness, and some parody aspects of it. (The good guys in the movie basically could be interpreted as pretty evil fascists vs. the book with a different theme.)

Which three authors would you invite to a dinner party?

Whoa, tricky question. There are so many possibilities. Can I choose dead people? I think I’d invite Howard Zinn who wrote A People’s History of the United States, and then Ayn Rand who wrote Atlas Shrugged, and then just stay totally silent and let them argue and maybe film it and put it on YouTube. Third author I’d invite would be my sister, so she could argue along with me.

How did you come up with this new fascinating world with Diabolics?

The primary thing I had in mind was that this future is set so far from now that the automatization we are already facing (human jobs supplanted by machines) has progressed to a point where the mechanical underpinnings of society are totally self-sustaining and self-perpetuating. That means a few things 1) it’s not critical for people to be able to understand how the machines work, once they totally sustain themselves, and 2) people are relatively extraneous, and unnecessary. Since I wanted an I, Claudius type of story, I envisioned an Empire with these conditions. Power would exist among those who ultimately had control over the machines, and the fact that most people are extraneous and unnecessary would reduce their status immensely. And if the great mass of humanity is deemed ‘Excess’ because they aren’t viewed as important, then it made sense that there’d be no compunctions about creating humans with certain qualities just for the service of ‘real’ people. Those factors, all together, sort of led to the universe of The Diabolic as I imagined it.

If you could visit one fictional world, which would you chose?

Star Trek! Their future is my idea of a utopia. Of course, in that universe, I’d probably spend all my time in the holodeck.

Do you have any advice for young writers?

Read a lot and write a lot! Also: I was a very sensitive person easily hurt by rejection—and yet I overcame that when it comes to writing by trying again and again and again, and failing over and over. My advice is, if you want to do this for a living: get used to bashing your head against the same wall time and again, because everyone gets rejected. A lot. It took seven books for me to sell one, and then several more to sell another. If you grow a thick skin, you will make it.

What was the thought process behind curating your Literary YA Box?

I gave a lot of thought to what might interest the same readers of The Diabolic, yet also prove relevant to the themes of the story. I am so thrilled, also, that I managed to get a card game in there!

Click here to get S.J.’s Literary YA Box, complete with an
exclusive, annotated copy of The Diabolic!

What is your favorite thing that you have received in the mail?

Of all time? It was when I got into the school of my choice. My dad picked me up, handed me a thin envelope and said, “Well, you got a thin letter from [this school I didn’t really care about]… And a thick one from here!” Most delightful mail of my life.

What is your longest running subscription?

Publishers Marketplace. I always vowed before I sold a book that I wasn’t going to spend any money on writing type stuff (conferences, membership to places) until I sold, because I couldn’t yet justify it. I always broke this rule when I had a book about to go on submission. I’d subscribe to PM for a month and look up all the recent sales, editors, etc. Once I finally sold Insignia, I had no reason to end my subscription. It’s not really necessary for me, but I just love checking it every day and seeing what’s coming in the book world.

Divider

NetGalley Author Interview: Katherine Reay

Katherine Reay has enjoyed a life-long affair with the works of Jane Austen and her contemporaries—who provide constant inspiration both for writing and for life. She is the author of three previous novels, and her debut, Dear Mr. Knightley, was a 2014 Christy Award Finalist, winner of the 2014 INSPY Award for Best Debut, and winner of two Carol Awards for Best Debut and Best Contemporary.

Katherine holds a BA and MS from Northwestern University and is a wife, mother, runner, and tae kwon do black belt. After living all across the country and a few stops in Europe, Katherine and her family recently moved back to Chicago. Visit her on line at katherinereay.com, Facebook: katherinereaybooks Twitter: @Katherine_Reay

A Portrait of Emily Price

Request It!

Pub Date: November 1, 2016
Women's Fiction, General Fiction
Published by Thomas Nelson - Fiction

See More of Their Titles

Art restorer Emily Price has never encountered anything she can’t fix—until she meets Ben, an Italian chef, who seems just right. When Emily follows Ben home to Italy, she learns that his family, however, is another matter . . .

Emily Price—fix-it girl extraordinaire and would-be artist—finds herself in Atlanta, repairing objects damaged in a house fire. As she works to restore the home and dreams of one family, she strives to keep the pieces of her own life in perfect order and secure her own happy ending—a gallery show of her own. There is no time for distractions, especially not the ultimate distraction of falling in love.

But Chef Benito Vassallo’s relentless pursuit proves hard to resist. Visiting from Italy, Ben works to reconnect with his brother and breathe new life into his aunt and uncle’s faded restaurant, Piccolo. And soon after their first meeting, he works to win Emily as well—inviting her into his world and into his heart.

Emily astonishes everyone when she accepts Ben’s proposal and follows him home. Upon landing in Rome, she is enchanted with Italy. But instead of allowing the land, culture and people to transform her, Emily imposes her will upon everyone and everything around her, alienating Ben’s tightly knit family. Only Ben’s father, Lucio, gives Emily the understanding she needs to lay down her guard. Soon, Emily’s life and art begin to blossom, and Italy’s beauty and rhythm take hold of her spirit.

Yet when she unearths long-buried family secrets, Emily wonders if she really fits into Ben’s world. Will the joys of Italy become just a memory, or will Emily share in the freedom and grace that her life with Ben has shown her are possible?

Divider

NetGalley Author Interview with Lis Wiehl

In her latest Newsmakers thriller, New York Times bestselling author and Fox News legal analyst Lis Wiehl weaves a taut and chilling story. The Candidate is packed with political intrigue and media manipulation as the lust for power turns deadly indeed.

The Candidate

Request It!

Pub Date: October 4, 2016
Mystery & Thrillers
Published by Thomas Nelson

See More of Their Titles

How far will a candidate go to become president? Erica Sparks—America’s top-rated cable-news host—is about to find out.

Mike Ortiz is a dynamic war hero favored to win the White House. Standing by his side is his glamorous and adoring wife, Celeste. But something about this seemingly perfect couple troubles Erica. Is Celeste really who she seems? And most importantly, what really happened in that squalid Al-Qaeda prison where Mike Ortiz spent nine months?

But more than the nation’s future is at stake. Erica’s relentless search for the truth puts the life of her preteen daughter Jenny in danger, even as Erica’s own dark past threatens to overtake her.

Divider

NetGalley Author Interview with Ryan Aldred

Ben Cooper was supposed to be on his Pacific honeymoon. Not waking up in a Costa Rican prison cell with no memory of the night before. But surely his friend and lawyer Victoria didn’t need to fly down from Toronto overnight. After all, the police would let him go once he sobered up and paid his fine. Right?

Except for the little matter of a murder. And Ben’s buying a beachside bar from the victim, hours before the man’s death. With foreclosure looming and death threats piling up on the rum-soaked bar, they must turn to the wild idea that got them into this mess. But to survive, they’ll need every skill at their disposal – including those they’d rather forget they have.

Rum Luck

Request It!

Pub Date: June 22, 2016
Mystery & Thrillers, Humor
Published by Five Star Publishing

See More of Their Titles

Divider

NetGalley Author Interview

Riley Callahan’s plans to reveal his secret feelings for his best friend Paige are derailed when his life is drastically altered in Afghanistan.

After an IED leaves Riley an amputee, he plans to put some distance between himself and Paige. But when he returns home, he finds his family has arranged for him to stay with her. As the weeks wear on, Paige’s feelings for Riley begin to shift into uncharted territory. Will she be able to deny her feelings for another Callahan brother? And will Riley let his heart heal so he can let Paige in?

Just a Kiss

Request It!

Pub Date: September 06, 2016
Romance
Published by Thomas Nelson

See More of Their Titles

Divider

Exclusive Interview with Beth Revis

LYA01JustBoxA World Without You by Beth Revis has received a tremendous amount of interest on NetGalley–and we’re excited to share this special Q&A with Beth about the book and something cool she’s doing with Quarterly:

Beth is curating their first-ever Literary YA box! This box includes an exclusive version of A World Without You with Beth’s handwritten annotations, 2 more books hand-picked by Beth, and some fun bookish goods. Order your box now, plus get an exclusive 10% discount! Just enter the code: NETGALLEY at checkout. (Psst: Act fast, the box ships out this week! Subscribe by 7/22 to get it.)

NetGalley Author Interview

A World Without You

Pub Date: July 19, 2016
Teens & YA
Published by Razorbill

See More of Their Titles

Could you tell us a little bit about yourself and how you got into writing?

I’ve always wanted to be a writer; I remember writing a short story in first grade that was hung up on the teacher’s wall and feeling like it was destiny! Maybe it’s because I’m from the south, where nothing is ever fact, just a tale to expound upon, but fiction has been my first and truest love for as long as I can remember.

What is your favorite novel of all time?

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by CS Lewis changed my life. I read that novel when I was a little girl in my local library, hiding under the stairs that led to the children’s section. I’d read it before, but there was something about that moment when I realized that Aslan was a lion in a story, but also represented something more. That revelation that books where more than paper and ink and could have deeper meanings really impacted me and made me look at literature in a new way.

In your opinion, has there ever been a movie that is better than the book?

That is such a difficult question because it’s so, so rare. But I’m going to go with Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk, in part because even he himself felt the movie added to the story in ways the book didn’t.

Which three authors would you invite to a dinner party?

JK Rowling, so she can tell me all about Hogwarts and make my fan fic dreams come true, Mary Shelley so we can talk about how useless Percy was and how cool it was that she invented horror writing in her spare time, and Oscar Wilde (no explanation needed).

In your book, Bo has the power of time-travel. What would your power be?

I don’t really want the power to travel through time, but I’d love the power to pause time. I just want to take a nap and read books without getting behind on all my work!

If you could visit one fictional world, which would you chose?

Hogwarts, after Voldemort’s fall. I don’t want to fight in the battles, I don’t want to live in peril. I just want to cast cool spells and hang out with Hagrid and play quidditch.

Do you have any advice for young writers?

When given the choice between staying inside and writing or doing something new, do the new thing. The best stories come from a life lived well, so constantly push yourself to explore and discover and meet new people.

What was the thought process behind curating your Literary YA Box?

I wanted to tap into the key values of the book. I feel like each book has a beating heart, and that’s what I wanted to reach. A World Without You is about time travel and death and life and reality and mental health and family and friendship, but the beating heart lies in the connections we all have to each other. It’s what the strings on the book cover represent, and it was a key part in developing the contents of the box.

Click here to get Beth’s Literary YA Box, complete with an
exclusive, annotated print edition of A World Without You!

What is your favorite thing that you have received in the mail?

Fan mail! I always hope that people read and connect to my words, and hearing back from readers that they read my book is really just awe-inspiring.

What is your longest running subscription?

I had a CD subscription service that saw me through my teenage years. I still remember struggling with the plastic to get to those CDs!

Exclusive NetGalley Question

What inspired you to write A World Without You?

I never know where an idea starts. It just sort of forms in my head, slowly bubbling to the surface. And then one day, it’s there. Characters and plot and story, and I just have to peel back the layers as I write to discover it all.

But I think, subconsciously at least, this story started with my desire to change the past. My brother struggled with mental illness growing up, and as a kid, I know I didn’t understand and didn’t handle it as well as I should have. Our relationship faltered. And then, one day, it was too late. So I wanted to change the past, at least fictionally, and wrote a story about time travel.

As I wrote, however, the story shifted. I found out I was pregnant while I was still drafting and editing the novel, and this story about the past became a story about the future as well. Regrets turned to hope. The end result is a book that I think blends what’s real and not, what happened and didn’t, what could be and what will never be.
LYABoxBanner (1)

Divider

6-25-2015 11-38-58 AM

In preparation for ThrillerFest X, the annual conference of the International Thriller Writers, we interviewed four bestselling, award-winning authors… who also all happen to be book reviewers. These ITW members shared their unique perspectives on writing & reading book reviews, trends in the Thriller genre and community, and even shared a few stories that made us laugh. We hope you enjoy this inside look as much as we did—and hopefully take away a book recommendation, or two!

It’s our pleasure to welcome:

DeSilva 1


Bruce DeSilva
grew up in a tiny Massachusetts mill town where the mill closed when he was ten. This parochial little place was sadly bereft of metaphors—and assonance and irony were also in short supply. Nevertheless, his crime fiction has won the Edgar and Macavity Awards; has been listed as a finalist for the Shamus, Anthony, and Barry Awards; and has been published in ten foreign languages. His short stories have appeared in Akashic Press’s award-winning noir anthologies. He has reviewed books for The New York Times Sunday Book Review, and his reviews for The Associated Press continue to appear in hundreds of publications. Previously, he was a journalist for forty years, most recently as writing coach world-wide for AP, editing stories that won nearly every major journalism prize including the Pulitzer. A Scourge of Vipers, the fourth novel in his hardboiled crime series, was recently published by Forge.

Jon


Jon Land
is the USA Today bestselling author of 37 novels, including six titles in the critically acclaimed Caitlin Strong Texas Ranger series of which the most recent, Strong Darkness, won the 2014 USA Books Best Book Award and the 2015 International Book Award in the Thriller category. That followed Strong Rain Falling winning both the 2014 International Book Award and 2013 USA Best Book Award for Mystery-Suspense. His most recent book, Black Scorpion, was published on April 7 with the next in the Caitlin Strong series, Strong Light of Day, coming in October. He’s a 1979 graduate of Brown University, lives in Providence, Rhode Island and can be found on the Web at jonlandbooks.com or on Twitter @jondland.

Jeff Ayers


Jeff Ayers
is a freelance reviewer of suspense/thrillers for the Associated Press, Library Journal (2012 Fiction Reviewer of the Year), Booklist, and RT Book Reviews. He’s the author of Voyages of Imagination: The Star Trek Fiction Companion (Pocket Books), the library thriller Long Overdue (Stonehouse), the YA mystery co-written with Kevin Lauderdale titled The Fourth Lion (Booktrope), and the e-book original thriller Assassin’s Agenda (Detective Ink). He co-wrote the short story Last Shot with Jon Land that appeared in the anthology Love is Murder, edited by Sandra Brown. Jeff co-hosts an Internet radio show with John Raab of Suspense Magazine called Beyond the Cover, which has interviews with book industry professionals plus reviews and discussions about the world of publishing. He is on the board of directors for the Pacific Northwest Writers Association, and a member of the International Thriller Writers, Inc.

MylesKnapp


Myles Knapp
has been held at gunpoint by the Rio police, fought for his life against a hammer-wielding psycho and lost more full contact judo fights to Marines than he can count. As a reviewer, he’s read over 5,000 thrillers and is determined to read another 5,000. Since 2001, his column, “Grit-Lit,” has appeared in major newspapers and websites including The San Jose Mercury, Oakland Tribune, Contra Costa Times and affiliates.

A marketing and sales professional, he has lived and worked in the United States, Asia, Europe, Australia and New Zealand. When not busy completing his second and third Revenge School novels, Myles is reading, lifting heavy weights and riding his motorcycle or bicycle.

From your unique perspective of being a Thriller author and a book reviewer, can you describe the Thriller community? Is there anything unique amongst those contributing to and interested in this genre that perhaps isn’t a characteristic of other literary communities?  

Bruce: Writers of thrillers (and their close cousins, the mystery writers) constitute an incredibly welcoming and supportive creative community. As someone who has been writing, editing, and teaching for more than forty years, I can tell you with utter certainty that most writing communities are not like this. There’s a lot of competition and jealousy out there. For example, my wife is a poet. We know a lot of very nice poets, but as a group, they’re given to cattiness and backstabbing. And academic writers? Fuhgeddaboutit! But from the moment my first novel, Rogue Island, appeared six years ago, the thriller community opened its arms to me. Even the biggest stars–people like Joseph Finder, Dennis Lehane, and Harlan Coben—went out of their way to offer advice and encouragement. For that, I’ll always be grateful.

Jon: Trying to challenge me right from the start, eh? Hey, I love talking about the thriller community because, thanks to ITW, it’s become unusually tight-knit. I say unusually because writers are normally perceived, rightfully so, as an amorphous, disconnected bunch with each living in his or her own little box. Since its inception, ITW has expanded that box and left a side open so everyone is welcome to come in. I can’t truly say if this unique among other literary communities because I’m not a part of them. But I can say that the very mission of ITW is basically creating a community where the haves reach out and down to the not-yet-haves. Writers helping writers, in other words, and, yes, I do believe that is somewhat unique anyway perhaps because we’ve come to realize that the better the genre does, the better we all do.

Jeff: There are so many different subgenres in the world of thrillers – everything from legal and historical to romantic and action/adventure. So you can imagine how diverse thriller writers are. They get the adrenaline flowing, and keep the reader up all night – so they have that in common. Without exception, everyone I have met in the thriller community has been wonderful, friendly, and very gracious with their time and advice. It may be unique to the thriller community, however, that we regularly alarm taxi drivers and restaurant servers with our discussion of how to hide bodies and cause explosions.

Myles: I am very fortunate to review almost exclusively thrillers so most of my experiences are with thriller readers. In general, I find thriller readers to be more active and engaged than readers of tea cozies or “literate writing.” Continue reading “Author Interview – Thriller Edition”

Divider