Guest Post: The In’s and Out’s of NetGalley

I’m happy to welcome Lili, Children’s Publicity Intern at Bloomsbury USA and a blogger, as our guest writer today. Lili has been documenting her internship experiences in publishing in her Intern Diaries series and recently reflected on the NetGalley approval process from a publisher’s point of view. At NetGalley, we’re always looking for new ways to help our members improve their chances of being approved, and becoming better recommenders. Keep reading to find out more about what publishers look for in NetGalley profiles, and hopefully you’ll take away a tip or two!

The below post originally appeared on Lili’s Reflections in her Intern Diaries series.
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After my first internship at a literary agency, I put together a free-flowing post about what I learned. Well, now that I am at Bloomsbury, I want to do the same thing as I go, but share it with my readers since I’m quickly discovering that many of you aspire to do the same thing that I am doing now! With 5 months under my belt and several more to go, I think now’s a good time to start recording my thoughts! This post series will be posted on Sunday’s whenever I get the time.

I got a few questions about NetGalley, so I just wanted to post about it to hopefully clear things up in all areas!

Here is something that I learned and never really realized as a blogger in regards to NetGalley…many titles have a limited amount of people that are allowed to download it. Those messages you get about there not being enough eARCs are actually real!

And I know you’re sitting there thinking it’s an eARC, it’s not physical, so why is there a limit? And there’s a limit because, like ARCs, eARCs are meant to be read by a certain audience with certain kinds of platforms to get the word out there.

As an intern, I do man the NetGalley account for review requests and media professional requests. Yes, these are two different things. If you are a blogger, you should characterize yourself as a reviewer, by the way. It’s important that you do this. There are certain titles with important caps that I can’t touch, but otherwise I am told to simply look at the blogs and use my best judgment while staying within a certain statistic or expectation range.

So, some NetGalley pieces of advice…

1. Make sure your blog links work.
So many requests filter in on a single day that we can’t go googling for your blog. You have the option to link a website, so link your platform’s website! After linking it, go back in and check to make sure you linked it properly, because when we try to click sometimes and we are taken to an error page because a letter or a dot is missing in the URL, you’re most likely going to get denied for not having a platform. Continue reading “Guest Post: The In’s and Out’s of NetGalley”

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